Health Archive



TechCrunch / The reinvention of medicine: Dr. Algorithm v0-v7 and beyond

The “practice of medicine” developed through tradition, and the experiential evolution of best practices with small-scale medical research studies can be substantially improved through the “science of medicine” with statistically better-validated data and conclusions. Much of the current practice is driven by conclusions derived from partial information about a patient’s history and symptoms, incomplete medical understanding based as much on opinions as validated science, and interacting subjectively with known and unknown biases of the physician, hospital and healthcare system. Read More

Wired / The prognosis for data-led medicine is healthy

Today's medicine is more practice than science, albeit intelligent practice. Too much is left to qualitative judgments based on tradition, experience and dated, often un-tested, beliefs. But we are about to make a quantum leap in the capabilities of medicine driven by digital health technologies, sensors and data science. It's only a matter of time before this leap in technology empowers individuals to become the CEOs of their own health. Read More

Big data, better health

In this video, hear from Ginger.io founder/CEO, Anmol Madan, as he explains how the explosion in data and sensors transitions care from episodic data to continuous insight, which results in improved clinical outcomes and cost savings. Read More

Rockefeller University Insight Lecture Series / 2030: 20-percent doctor included?

"Silicon Valley is not a place but a state of mind." – Vinod Khosla In this talk, Vinod will speak about the ways in which he's seeking to apply Silicon Valley principles and approaches to transform, even foster a revolution in, healthcare. We'll hear Vinod argue that much of what physicians do can be done better by well-designed sensors, passive and active data collectors and analytics without taking away the human element of care. Read More

TechCrunch / Do we need doctors or algorithms?

Let’s start with healthcare (or sickcare, as many knowledgeable people call it). Think about what happens when you visit a doctor. You have to physically go to the hospital or some office, where you wait (with no real predictability for how long), and then the nurse probably takes you in and checks your vitals. Only after all this does the doctor show up and, after some friendly banter, asks you to describe your own symptoms. Read More